September 2013


See on Scoop.itLeadership, Innovation & Enterprise

Unanticipated events, especially extreme unanticipated events, can harm us or even destroy us. But they can also help us to grow and make us stronger. If they do the former, we tend to fear them and avoid them wherever possible….

Library@NYP‘s insight:

In this day and age, it is important for us to learn and grow from volatility and unexpected events by strengthening ourselves as a result of exposure and experience. In Nassim Nicolas Taleb’s latest book on Antifragility, we  learn the 7 system design principles that institutions can adopt to reduce the fragility of the current systems. Many government and educational institutions have been designed as ‘push systems’ that tend to do well in stable times but poorly during uncertain times and rapid changes. Taleb also lays down 12 strategies for antifragility that individuals or institutions can pursue in order to thrive in these challenging times. 

See on edgeperspectives.typepad.com

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See on Scoop.itLeadership, Innovation & Enterprise

Good Leadership skills are important whether the group you lead is big or little. These skills are what is necessary to effectively lead a group, and one that…

Library@NYP‘s insight:

In leadership, success can sometimes be a stumbling block if one is not careful. According to the author, it is the summit syndrome when the leader may run the risk of keeping people away, be on the defence rather than offence, and become a taker instead of a giver. It is much harder to stay king than to be king. A good leader must always keep learning, listening and giving. As the wise saying goes, man is tested by his praises. Get great tips on leadership skills today from reading this article!

See on goodleadershipskills.net

See on Scoop.itLeadership, Innovation & Enterprise

We don’t look at everything in our environment as an opportunity for ingenuity—but we should. Read an excerpt.

Library@NYP‘s insight:

In her new book, Stanford’s Technology Ventures Program Executive Director, Tina Seelig explains creativity using the Innovation Engine model which has 6 elements. Knowledge, imagination and attitude reside in the mind whereas habitat, resources and culture belong to the environment. It is interesting that one of the creativity techniques is working with forced constraints, like Amazon. We should also view failures as ‘data’ to jump start our creativity, like Instagram. Trained in neuroscience, Tina also teaches an innovation and creative course at Stanford. See http://venture-lab.org/creativity.

See on www.ssireview.org

See on Scoop.itLeadership, Innovation & Enterprise

Develop and enhance your creative thinking in and out of the classroom.

Library@NYP‘s insight:

This is an interesting article on how college students should develop their creativity which is one of the soft skills employers found lacking in the new recruits. According to neuroscience, the creative process is complex.There are 3 areas college students can work at – develop deep learning skills to be more adaptable and able to take risks, develop your thinking and learning beyond your typecast and grow your personality to be more innovative and all-rounded.

See on www.psychologytoday.com

See on Scoop.itLeadership, Innovation & Enterprise

Library@NYP‘s insight:

To stay innovative, the company should inculcate an innovation culture where employees at all levels must continue to challenge the status quo and innovate in their own job areas.

See on knowledge.insead.edu

See on Scoop.itLeadership, Innovation & Enterprise

Akash: The following post is by leadership speaker and expert Paul Thornton. Paul has coauthored the book, Public Speaking Tips from the Pros with me. This post is based on his book, Leadership-Off the Wall.

Library@NYP‘s insight:

Practical tips from successful leaders.

See on communicationskillstips.com

See on Scoop.itLeadership, Innovation & Enterprise

“Thoughtful cognitive neuroscientists such as Rex Jung, Darya Zabelina, Andreas Fink, John Kounios, Mark Beeman, Kalina Christoff, Oshin Vartanian, Jeremy Gray, Hikaru Takeuchi and others are on the forefront of investigating what actually happens in the brain during the creative process. And their findings are overturning conventional notions surrounding the neuroscience of creativity.

 

The latest findings from the real neuroscience of creativity suggest that the right brain/left brain distinction is not the right one when it comes to understanding how creativity is implemented in the brain. Creativity does not involve a single brain region or single side of the brain.

 

Instead, the entire creative process– from the initial burst of inspiration to the final polished product– consists of many interacting cognitive processes and emotions. Depending on the stage of the creative process, and what you’re actually attempting to create, different brain regions are recruited to handle the task.”

Library@NYP‘s insight:

Interesting article on how our brain works in our creative thinking process.

See on blogs.scientificamerican.com

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